CTRF
Current Research

Current Research

Snow Cover February report

Effect of Snow Cover and Anti-Transpirants

February 2017 Progress Report

Selection and Management of Bentgrass Cultivars Update

Summary of Proposal: Atmospheric CO2 concentrations are expected to reach between 500 to1000 ppm by the end of the century and, as a consequence, Canada and other northern countries may experience a seasonal temperature increase between 1.5 and 4°C.

February 2017 Progress Report

Report October 2016

Results October 2016

Rolling and Resistance: A Means to Reduced Fungicide Usage on Golf Course Greens
This proposed research, coordinated by Dr. Joseph Vargas at Michigan State University, will test and establish regimens for reduced fungicide management of creeping bentgrass putting greens by utilizing a disease-resistant cultivar and optimizing lightweight rolling practices. It will determine whether acceptable levels of disease, turfgrass quality, and playability are obtainable without the use of fungicide through data collection and analysis. The project will be completed in December 2017.

February 2017 Rolling Interim Report

2016 Interim Progress Report

September 2016 update

The Effect of Snow Cover and Anti-Transpirants on the Persistence of Snow Mould Fungicides
The objective of this project, coordinated by Dr. Paul Koch at the University of Wisconsin, is to determine the rate of degradation of fungicides chlorothalonil and propiconazole applied alone or as a mixture with an anti-transpirant under constant snow cover and in the complete absence of snow. It will also correlate the fungicide concentrations on the leaf blades sampled from the field with the level of disease symptoms on creeping bentgrass plants inoculated with snow mould fungi incubated in a growth chamber. The work will be completed in June 2019.

Determining Soil Potassium Requirements of Sand-Based Putting Greens

The objective of this research, coordinated by Dr. Douglas Soldat at the Wisconsin Turfgrass Association, is to evaluate putting green quality and disease incidence over a wide range of soil test and tissue potassium levels. The optimal level of soil potassium for maximum turfgrass health remains an open question. Potassium fertilization practices vary widely, from little to no applied potassium to over 6 pounds per thousand square feet. There is ample evidence that potassium plays an important role in drought tolerance, but high levels of potassium have also been shown to exacerbate gray snow mold damage. The work will be completed in February 2017.

Soil Potassium Research Update 21 Sept. 2016

Potassium Research Update Soldat Sept. 2015

 

Feb 2016 CATR Potassium Research Update

Testing Lower Risk Fungicides Against Turf Diseases

This project, coordinated by Dr. Thomas Hsiang at the University of Guelph, is to investigate the use of lower risk fungicides against turfgrass diseases. The specific practical objective is to quantify the extent by which common diseases such as dollar spot, fusarium patch and snow molds can be reduced in lab and field tests, using different application regimes of low risk chemicals such as acetic acid (vinegar), borax, citric acid, garlic powder, hydrogen peroxide, iron sulfate, lime sulfur, phosphites, soaps, sodium chloride, and sulfur. This project will be completed in April 2018.

CTRF Progress Progress Report (April 1, 2016 covering the period Oct 1, 2015 to Feb 15, 2016)

Selection and Management of Creeping Bentgrass for Improved Resistance to Fusarium Patch Under Current and Future Conditions.

This project offers a unique opportunity to study the interaction between a perennial grass and a pathogenic fungi under conditions of climate change. This project is funded by the CTRF and Petro Canada as well as having funding support from the NSERC. It will include collaboration between the University of Guelph (Dr. T Hsiang) and STERF, the Scandinavian equivalent of the CTRF as well as the involvement of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (Dr. A. Bertrand) in an effort to improve the performance of perennial grasses. The project will assess resistant genetic material to fusarium patch under actual climate conditions. Resistance activators will also be tested during this project. The final results from this project are due in the Fall of 2017.

CTRF Progress Report – January 2016

CTRF progress-report Hsiang Sept. 2015

Increasing Winter Hardiness of Golf Greens and Fairways by Fall Fertilization Regime and Manipulation of Plant Hormones.

This project, coordinated by Dr. Eric Lyons at the University of Guelph involves research on “Increasing Winter Hardiness of Golf Greens and Fairways by Fall Fertilization Regime and Manipulation of Plant Hormones”. Winter survival of golf greens and fairways continues to be a major concern of golf courses throughout Ontario and Canada. There is acceptance within the research community that an important aspect of survival is the ability of the grass to maintain dormancy during thaw and refreeze events in late winter. The research will explore different management practices and their effect on the dormancy of golf greens and fairways experiencing thaw and refreeze events. The result of the research will be management recommendations regarding fertilizing and plant nutrition plant growth regulators and hormone manipulation to increase the winter survival of the golf course greens and fairways. This research will be completed by September of 2017.

Fall Applications of Nitrogen and Potassium and the Effect on Winter Hardiness in Annual Bluegrass.

The principal researcher for this project is Katie Dodson, Olds College. The study will focus on fall fertilization practices that will maximize the cold hardiness of turfgrass in cold climates. Little information exists on this important issue and the recommendations that have come from research conducted have been somewhat contradictory. Nitrogen and potassium will be applied at various rates and intervals in the fall period in order to determine application effects on cold hardiness. Results from the study are expected to provide specific recommendations for turf managers on fall fertilization in order to ensure maximum cold hardiness. The study is expected to take three years, ending in May 2016.

Fall Applications of Nitrogen and Potassium and the Effect on Winter Hardiness in Annual Bluegrass – February 2016

Fall Application of Nitrogen and Potassium and Their Effect on Winter Hardiness in Annual Bluegrass

The Impact of Golf Courses on Nutrient Loss and Overall Pollutant Export from Developed Areas.

This project will examine the degree to which golf courses may have a positive impact on the export of nutrients and other pollutants into runoff in developed areas. Dr. Murray from Lakehead University (Orillia campus) is the lead for this project. Contrary to commonly-held belief, previous research has suggested that careful management of turfgrass can lead to improved water quality in developed areas, owing to the ability of a healthy, properly-maintained stand of turf to retain and filter water. This project will examine the effect of different maintenance practices on the quality and quantity of runoff resulting from precipitation and snow melt on golf courses. The expected results will include a set of best management practices that clearly define when management practices such as fertilization, irrigation and aeration should be used to maximize the positive impact on water quality. The results from this project are expected to be delivered in September of 2015.

CTRF Project Report January 2016-C. Murray

Murray Lakehead Progress Report June15

Identification of Drought Resistant Turfgrass Cultivars for Water Conservation.

The work and reports for this project will be performed under the direction of Jim Ross, Principal Investigator at Olds College and Dr. Eric Lyons Ph.D., Principal Investigator at the University of Guelph. Water use in urban environments is an important issue, and over the past few years watering restrictions have become commonplace. Restrictions on turfgrasses as landscape plants have been proposed in a number of jurisdictions in North America. This project will assist the turfgrass industry by: 1) helping the industry select turfgrass varieties that maintain green cover and playability with less water use, and 2) determining the actual water use of different turfgrass species and varieties at different mowing heights. Research is expected to be completed by September of 2016.

Drought tolerance annual report 10-15

Evaluation of Ventilation Systems under Winter Covers to Prevent Injury from Anoxia on Annual Bluegrass Putting Greens.

Winter injury is a major problem for turf managers in cold climates of the northern hemisphere. This project continues work in the area of winter injury in order to discover practices that will ensure the survivability of turfgrass, particularly annual bluegrass putting greens. Olds, Alberta is a good location to conduct this research as winters are typically long and cold. However, short intermittent periods of warm weather and/or rain can create icing conditions. This can create conditions of anoxia where oxygen is completely depleted and/or carbon dioxide builds up to toxic levels. Similar conditions can occur under impermeable winter covers. The final results from this project are expected in 2015.

18-month IE Progress Report

Management of Take all Patch in High Ph Soils

The work and reports for this project will be performed under the direction of Katerina Jordan, Principal Investigator at the University of Guelph. The disease take-all patch, caused by the fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. avenae has been a major issue on golf sites in Ontario and the prairie provinces, likely due to the alkaline soil pH levels found in those regions. The primary objectives of this study are to positively identify G. graminis from golf turf samples throughout Canada and to develop best management practices for the disease in areas with alkaline soils.

CTRF Report for TAP Project March and CTRF Report for TAP Project September

March 2016 report

Selection and Management of Bentgrass Cultivars Update

Summary of Proposal: Atmospheric CO2 concentrations are expected to reach between 500 to1000 ppm by the end of the century and, as a consequence, Canada and other northern countries may experience a seasonal temperature increase between 1.5 and 4°C. Report October 2016 Results October 2016


Research and Development Yearbook 2015

Winter injuries are a significant economic burden for golf courses in the Nordic countries. STERF has developed a winter management programme that has the overall aim of providing the golf industry with information and tools to minimize turfgrass winter damage… Research and Development Yearbook 2015